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Can you recite the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution? If you are a certain age, you probably learned the Preamble by watching ABC-TV's School House Rock. A generation learned math, grammar, history and science from cartoon musical videos.

School House Rock did more for literacy than a schoolyard full of unopened textbooks. This method, often referred to as superlearning, is being employed successfully throughout the world as a way to dramatically accelerate the learning process and make it enjoyable. We will summarize it on this page and encourage you to integrate it with the other resources on this site.

Music has the ability to synchronize the brain's left analytical hemisphere with the right creative spatial hemisphere. When both hemispheres are engaged, the brain is able receive more information. You can retrieve information quickly because the music acts as a carrier wave to long-term memory storage.

According to Gordon Dryden and Dr. Jeannette Vos, authors of The Learning Revolution:

"Music stimulates and awakens, reviving bored or sleepy learners and increasing blood and oxygen flow to the brain.

  • Music inspires emotion, creating a clear passage to long-term memory.
  • Music is a stage-changer and can be used effectively to get students into an
    effective learning state."
You should hear music playing from the player in the lower right portion of the webpage. This player works in much the same way as any music software available for computers today. To stop the music, simply press the square shaped Stop button. To skip forward and backwards in the list of available music without waiting for the current song to end, use the buttons on the right and left with double arrows on them. The bar across the top of the player is the volume slider, you can slide this from left (quietest) to right (loudest).
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