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This set of directions and news for World Health Medical School will be updated periodically.

New video teleconferencing
We are now encouraging the use of audio-visual teleconferences with staff members, offering full technical support, free hardware, and payment for attending each conference.
Click here for instructions

Do NOT write any flashcards where the question is in a 50/50 form
A question should not give two options, such as either x or y. This is not much different than true/false. The student should not be allowed to guess by seeing the correct answer somewhere in the question. Thematically, flashcards should always have the fragment of information to be tested for on the answer side of the card. If the fragment appears somewhere in the question the student is not getting adequate study. Please visit this page for a list of examples.

Invoice Submissions
When you reach five items on an invoice, submit it. Each subtopic counts as one item on an invoice. All the edits you make within a single subtopic will appear as one item on that invoice. After you have edited five subtopics, submit the invoice.

Search
Added a search page. Click here to search our website.

Use of "New" functions in containers
Important: When in a container, authors do not need to use the "new subtopic" or other "new" functions. These create unnecessary new subtopics and tiers. All subtopics should be in place and ready for authors to use. If authors need a new subtopic created, they should contact the managing editor and/or tech support.

New Bug Report Form
Click here for the Bug Report and help us refine our software by reporting any bugs you encounter.

That and Which
We added a page explaining the difference between that and which. Click here to view it.

Italics
Italics: A page devoted to stylistic rules of italics

Pay Raise
The pay scale has increased as of 12/12/05. Please visit the payment page for details.

Custom Wordlist
A reliable spellchecker that recognizes medical terminology is necessary. You can download the files of medical words here.

Follow the AMA Style Guide and the Chicago Manual of Style 
For most style points, you can use these sources as a guideline. In cases of conflict between the two, defer to the AMA preference.

Download a Word document version of the style guide for authors here

Please read below for exceptions and clarifications.


Blank lengths and format.
No true/false flashcards.
Refer to separate number guide.
All commas required in a serial list (to improve clarity).
Derivation formats of punctuation, wording, prefixes, suffixes, foreign words, etc.
Elliptical answers to questions.
Leave articles in noun answers.
Indicate in the question if you are asking for a quantity by specifying with phrases such as "How many."
Do not use an abbreviation without spelling it out at least once before it is used.
Use single fragments of information for answers BEFORE more complex cards.
Phrase questions to generate unique answers.
Definitions asked forwards and backwards.
Grammatically self-sufficient flashcards.
Use of hints, where appropriate.
Tenth-grade reading level.
Your choice whether to use quotation marks or italics for emphasis.
All subjects must be internally consistent in style.

Numbers and Digits Update:
In general, if you use a number between 0 and 10, spell it out: four. This means spell all ordinals from one to nine (0 and 10 should not be spelled out).
Of course, there are exceptions:
Do not spell out measurements (14 oz, for example).
Do not spell out other noun modifiers (such as 45 years old). In this case, "45" modifies the noun "years," and should remain in digit form.
Do not spell out measurements of time (17 hours, for example).
Do not spell out numbers for any math problems, fractions, or decimals.
Use numbers for ranges, such as 67 through 79.
Use numbers and the symbol for percentages unless at the start of the sentence (39% in a sentence and Thirty-nine percent if starting a sentence).
Spell out any numbers beginning a sentence. If this is a large bulky number, such as 1,290,551, rewrite the sentence so it is not at the front.
Do not use numerals for consecutive numbers. Example: Write "The study consisted of five 40 year old males" NOT "The study consisted of 5 40 year old males."

Rewrite his/her and sentences with awkward commas
When sentences arise that require a pronoun, such as "his" or the more modern "his or hers," rewrite the entire sentence so that it no longer requires a pronoun. The same procedure applies to sentences, usually long and bulky ones, with awkward commas. Rewrite these or divide them into shorter sentences.

Added a Word document style guide for editors
Download the style guide for editors here

Registration Walkthrough Video
We have developed a quick video you can watch that will explain registration, account activation, logging in, and logging out. The video uses flash format, and will play in full screen. There are video controls at the bottom of the screen. It will close automatically at the end. To watch this registration video, please click here.

Important: Definitions Update
Rather than defining every medical term as it comes up in your subject, we are now asking that you only define terms that have not been (or will not be) defined in previous subjects. This will require some judgment on your part. When in doubt please include a definition. Please look at our new curriculum for the chronological order of subjects in our medical school.  From  this curriculum it should be evident that histology terms do not need to be defined if you are writing a pediatric subtopic. Conversely however, pediatric terminology must be defined if you are using it in the histology subject. Again, when in doubt include the definition and for groups of words, please contact the technical editor.

Derivations update
Rather than writing derivations for all terms as they are used in each subject, basic terms will have derivations in special Medical Terminology subjects at the beginning of school. If a term has a derivation in one of these subjects or in other subjects prior to your subject, DO NOT give the derivation again. Continue to derivate ADVANCED terms IF they are appearing for the first time. Use judgment and our search engine to make sure you are in fact making a derivation that is needed. Remember that derivations are memory devices, so once a student knows a word, he/she won't need additional memory reinforcement.  

EDD labor fact sheet
Click here to download a fact sheet about independent contractors under California state law.

Reminder
Text cannot be copied word-for-word from a medical book to write flashcards. This is plagiarism and will not be tolerated.

Drug Names
Unless approved by technical editor, all drugs should be named by their generic names. This is because generic names are the same from country to country while trade names vary greatly.

New Dictionary Resource
If you can't find a word or if you know there are multiple spellings for it, try Merriam-Webster's online dictionary here: www.m-w.com. For multiple spellings, use whichever version they have listed first.

Hint Changes
The hint format is showing signs of becoming overused. Try to write flashcards that require only a small hint. Example:

Q: The common causes of gloss_______ include viral infections, mechanical irritation by coarse objects, chemical irritation, and allergic reactions.
A: glossitis
 
Since "glossitis" means an inflamed tongue (which you would know if you had the original book in front of you), you can rewrite it this way, thus working a hint into the actual content of the sentence (which is far preferable):
 
Q: The common causes of an inflamed tongue, known as _______, include viral infections, mechanical irritation by coarse objects, chemical irritation, and allergic reactions.
A: glossitis

If you use a "partial-word hint," do not use letters at both the beginning and end of the blank. Use letters at either the beginning or the end.

Wrong:
Q: A fungating sore is a variety of g_______g chancroid.
A: granulating

Right:
Q: A fungating sore is a variety of g_______ chancroid.
A: granulating

Hints and Parentheses
Please use this form when making either/or hints:
Q: Acetylcholine may _______ (trigger/delay) the release of pulmonary secretions.
A: trigger

Commas
We now use the traditional English grammatical rule of putting a comma before "and" and "or" in every list. This is because the modern rule can create confusion and ambiguity. Consider the following two sentences:

        Pain, suffering, loss of income and medical bills are examples of damages.
        Pain, suffering, loss of income, and medical bills are examples of damages.

In the first sentence, it could mean a loss of income as well as a loss of medical bills, which doesn't make any sense and is potentially confusing. In the second sentence, it is clear that "loss" refers only to income. For purposes of clarity, use the traditional method of inserting a comma prior to "and" and "or" in a list of items.

New Minimum Number of 300 Questions
We require a minimum of 300 questions per week, not 100 as previously stipulated. There is no maximum and most writers submit more than 300. Submit each subtopic as you create it. DO NOT save them up and send multiple subtopics at one time. This is crucial so that you receive prompt feedback from us.

Dorland's Dictionary Problem
We have had a problem reported with Dorland's. Occasionally it will give unusual or inappropriate definitions. If you encounter this issue, we can provide you Stedman's Dictionary instead. Simply request a copy of Stedman's from us via email.

Third-party Images Needed
Our primary use of images for flashcards will come from third-parties. If you know where to secure images for educational use, or where to get permission from book publishers to use their images, contact us. We already have a variety of online sources, so check this page before you contact us if you are informing us about online sources.

Sketched Diagrams Still Needed
We still need sketched diagrams. We recommend SmartDraw6 obtainable at http://www.smartdraw.com. Download a free copy that you can use for 30 days. The program comes with thousands of medical, scientific and mathematical templates and sample diagrams that we have the license to use. Request a licensed copy from us. Give us a week's notice if you will need it. Visit our resources section for downloadable images and additional software.

 

 
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